Sticky Change Example 7: The Power of Checklists

Here’s the 7th example in the Sticky Change series.
Derived from: Chip and Dan Heath, Switch : How to Change Things When Change is Hard

In RAP10 we talked about building habits.

The Checklist Manifesto by Atul GawandeAnd we explored pre-thinking our actions to ensure we covered all the necessary things we had to do.
Atul Gawande uses checklists to save lives. That’s sounds a little outrageous until you realise he’s a surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.
In emergency situations making a big mistake could mean the difference between life and death.
He’s also a writer for the New Yorker and author of the highly regarded book The Checklist Manifesto.

Here’s some I could use…

• Packing for travelling – to ensure I have all the cables I need for my equipment
• Running workshops and lunches – to ensure I’m clear in the head to present and not thinking about all the logistics
• Publishing blog posts – to ensure I remember to tag and categorise them
• Cooking – to make sure I have all the ingredients when I go to the supermarket
• Business Systems – as a way to systematise what I do and have a VA do some work for me

What might you use a checklist for?

More Updates

Content Creation Process - Three big mistakes people make

What are the keys to an effective Content Creation Process? How do you consistently produce good quality content? It takes a strong commitment to create

The best Content Creation Planning ideas for Thought Leaders

The best content creation planning ideas for thought leaders helps you avoid wasting time by focusing on what to create, when to create and where

The best thought leadership content strategy in 3 questions

What’s the best thought leadership content strategy? How do you turn your thought leadership IP into content marketing that attracts new clients AND keeps existing